A Father’s Legacy…

The memory of the 21-gun salute by local military personnel at my Dad’s funeral in 1968 still chills me to the bone. I vividly remember standing beneath the attending adults as a (just turned) 5-year old wondering what was going on. Our beloved Dad had died unexpectedly at 34, while on a business trip to Kentucky and Mom was coping the best that she could. My brother, sister and I were age 7 and under and none of us could fully comprehend anything that was taking place. Our Dad, Floyd (Tink) Moore had served in the United States Air Force as a Staff Sergeant during the Korean War. Hundreds of fellow servicemen, friends and family attended his services. (Mom’s parents would later tell me that they had never seen so many people show up to pay final respects for someone). By all accounts, our Dad had been very well-liked and was frequently the ‘life of the party’ in the Jacksonville community. As the youngest of his 3 children living at home, I would end up searching for many years for clues as to who our Dad actually was….and sharing his legacy with other family members.

As long as I can remember, I have always been eager to discover details about Dad’s personality and life. I have few actual memories of our life together and have had to rely on other family members’ testimonies or old photos for answers to my questions. In recent years, ancestry.com and the internet have helped to connect me with living family members from Dad’s side of the family. What a blessing this has been! Living, breathing relatives have helped me to heal my grief and helped me to provide much sought after information to other family members. Along the way, I have discovered that many of Dad’s traits never really died. They live on in us– his children and grandchildren. His sensitive nature, creativity and love of others are just a few of the traits can be seen in his descendents. My sister excels at art, my brother has a knack for mechanics, I utilized my sensitive nature to guide me in my career as a social worker, and his grandchildren are a combination of the various traits. To this day, I always try to honor these gifts and do my part to continue sharing the insights behind his legacy.

Dad– Author Unknown

I can’t tell you, Daddy, how many times I’ve cried.
Since the day I was told my precious Dad had died.
It seems so impossible although I know it’s true.
As everything I see around reminds me of you.
I can still hear your laughter and see your smiling face.
I would have lost my sanity if not for God’s saving grace.
I have to close this letter now, but this is not good-bye.
For you will forever be with me in my heart and in my mind.
********************************
Dad by: Karen K. Boyer

He never looks for praises.
He’s never one to boast.
He just goes on quietly working
for those he loves the most.
His dreams are seldom spoken.
His wants are very few.
And most of the time his worries
will go unspoken too.
He’s there…A firm foundation
through all our storms of life.
A sturdy hand to hold to
in times of stress and strife.
A true friend we can turn to
when times are good or bad.
One of our greatest blessings
The man that we call Dad.
**************************************
Father’s Day will be celebrated across the United States this Sunday, June 18th. If you are lucky enough to still have your Dad around, let him know how much he means to you. Take time out to spend the day with him and create new family memories. Because you never know when the chance to do so will be gone forever.

Happy Father’s Day to all of the Dads, Granddads and even uncles who have shared their lives and have made (or continue to make) an impact on the lives of their family members!!

 

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